Connect with us

Latest

Interaction by Jimi Durso

Published

on

jimi-durso-bioOne great way to help find your own voice is to develop it through the people around you. If you’re in a band, sitting in at jams, or just playing along w/ jam tracks, how you interact with these can be a great source of discovering your individuality. And it’s pretty easy, since no one else will react exactly like you to begin with. But let’s look at some ways you can get more out of these dialogues.

First, whether you’re leading or following is really more of a continuum (or should be). Think of not just following the other musicians, but also nudging them a bit (if it’s live musician’s you’re playing with. It’s much more difficult w/ recordings). Can you change the energy in some way and get the other folk to follow you? Can you take what the others are doing and use it to forge a direction that you can then bring the rest of the ensemble along on? Or take how someone else responds to your moves and incorporate that into your next decision.

Next, you have to determine how the energy is changing (whether it’s your move or someone else’s) and what you’re specifically going to do about it. For instance: maybe the drummer has brought the energy level up by playing busier. You could play busier as well, but are there other ways to follow his or her energy? What about dropping down an octave (or up an octave) to compliment their change? Or playing closer to the bridge to get a nastier tone? Or just digging in and playing louder? Or turning on your octave divider (you did remember to bring an octave divider)? Or making your rhythm more syncopated (or less syncopated)? I could continue, but start imagining what you could do. You may find that in the situation, if you keep your mind open, you’ll know what you want to do.  But I’d suggest keeping a playful attitude. Try things, see what you come up with.

Also, do the same from the perspective of leading: how can you make the rest of the group bring the energy down (or up, or laterally)? What if you switch to just octaves and fifths (if you hadn’t been doing that already)? Maybe playing more legato or staccato? What about some sustained double stops? Listen to how the other members of the ensemble react to your choices.

You could also think of yourself as a bridge. What if the piano player has moved in a different direction, perhaps creating tension by playing more chromatically, or with more alterations in the chords. How can you communicate this to the drummer (assuming your drummer’s a bit tone deaf, or just doesn’t pay attention to the piano)? Maybe by playing some polyrhythms? Or dropping the downbeat? Think of how many ways you could communicate harmonic information rhythmically (then do the same to get the drummer’s thing across to the pianist).

This kind of thinking doesn’t only apply to improvised music. If you’re in a group doing original material, use the same approach when writing your parts. When the guitarist switches on the distortion for the chorus, how is your bass line going to react? Will you play driving eighth notes? Or just slam an octave on the 2 and 4? Or (hopefully) something I wouldn’t even thin of. Brainstorm all the things YOU might do in this situation. And have fun with it.

Twang!

www.JimiDurso.com

www.CoincidenceMachine.net

Bass Videos

Interview With Bassist Ciara Moser

Published

on

Interview With Bassist Ciara Moser

Bassist Ciara Moser…

Ciara and I sat down for this interview a few months after the launch of her debut album, “Blind. So what?”

Blind since birth, she is a powerhouse of talent; she is not only a professional bassist, but also composes music, and is a producer and educator. I am just blown away by her talent and perseverance.

Join me as we hear about Ciara’s musical journey, the details of her album, how she gets her sound, and her plans for the future.

Visit online:

www.ciara-moser.com 
IG @ moserciara
FB @ ciara.moser

Photos by Manuela Haeussler

Continue Reading

Gear News

New Gear: Black Ice Boost and Distort, Battery-Free Modules for Bass and Guitar

Published

on

New Gear: Black Ice Boost and Distort, Battery-Free Modules for Bass and Guitar

Black Ice Boost and Distort, Battery-Free Modules for Bass and Guitar…

Black Ice Enterprises introduces Black Ice Boost and Black Ice Distort, small, battery-free devices that can be easily installed in a bass or guitar.

Black Ice Boost offers two selectable stages of up to 7 dB of boost, broadly concentrated in the midrange frequencies to add humbucker-like qualities to Strat®, Tele® and other types of single-coil pickups. Black Ice Distort is an overdrive module that can be configured to offer anything from slight overdrive to distortion. Both models are compatible with all passive guitar pickups and electronics (they’re not compatible with battery-powered active pickups).

Black Ice Boost (SRP: $119.95; MAP, $79.95) can be installed using several wiring options, including a simple “stealth” install that utilizes a single push-pull pot, and a dual-switch option that allows users to select between two different levels of boost. For those using the boost along with Black Ice Distort, a second push-pull pot or switch can be used to select a clean or distorted boost.

The Black Ice Boost module is approximately 2/3 the size of a 9-volt battery, and can be easily installed in most instruments with no routing or permanent modifications required. The tone of the instrument remains completely unaffected when the boost is bypassed.

In addition to use with popular single-coil pickups, Black Ice Boost can also be used with other pickup types. Use it to fatten up a P-90 style pickup, or add girth to a low-wind humbucker. Jazz Bass® players can use the additional midrange content provided by Black Ice Boost to produce a sound that’s reminiscent of a P-Bass® or soapbar-type pickup. Black Ice Boost is not recommended for use with high-output humbuckers and other dark-sounding pickups.

Black Ice Distort (SRP: $27.95; MAP, $21.95) is an overdrive module that can be configured for just a touch of grit, or a more aggressive grind, all the way to a 1960’s-flavored fuzz. While its battery-free circuit will never replace the more refined sound of a well-designed pedal, it provides handy, there-when-you-need-it access to a variety of fun old-school flavors, and is a great way to add additional textures to an already overdriven amp or pedal. Bass players will especially dig its raw dirty grind.

Like Black Ice Boost, the sugar-cube-sized Black Ice Distort provides a lifetime of tone with no maintenance or power source required. A variety of wiring options are included that let you activate the Distort via a switch or push-pull pot, or by easily converting your guitar’s tone control into a control for the Black Ice Distort circuit. It can be used in conjunction with the Black Ice Boost for a wide variety of useful tones.

Black Ice Boost and Black Ice Distort are now shipping.

Visit online at www.blackiceoverdrive.com

Continue Reading

Latest

This Week’s Top 10 Basses on Instagram

Published

on

TOP 10 Basses of the week

Check out our top 10 favorite basses on Instagram this week…

Click to follow Bass Musician on Instagram @bassmusicianmag

FEATURED @loritabassworks @meridian_guitars @alpherinstruments @phdbassguitars @mgbassguitars @mauriziouberbasses @utreraguitars @sugi_guitars @branco_luthier @blasiusguitars

View More Bass Gear News

Continue Reading

Gear News

New Gear:  D’Addario’s New Humidipak

Published

on

New Gear:  D’Addario’s New Humidipak

D’Addario’s New Humidipak Absorb Protects Instruments Against Excess Moisture…

Utilizing two-way humidity control technology, D’Addario’s new Humidipak Absorb protects against damage to wooden instruments in environments with too much humidity. 

Humidipak Absorb allows players to safely return an instrument and case to the ideal relative humidity level. Using Boveda’s patented two-way humidity control technology, Absorb automatically soaks up excess moisture at a safe rate, re-establishing the right humidity level and eliminating the guesswork of revitalizing your instrument. 

Like all the Humidipaks before, using Humidipak Absorb is easy—there’s no dripping sponges or manual adjustments. All players need to do is put the humidification packets in the included pouches and place them in the instrument case, close the lid, and relax. The instrument and case will remain at the optimal 45-50% relative humidity level for 2-6 months. 

D’Addario’s other Humidipaks, Restore and Maintain, are still available for those who need to increase and sustain the humidity around their instrument. 

To learn more about Humidipak Absorb, visit ddar.io/absorb-pr 

Continue Reading

Bass Videos

Interview With Bassist Travis Book

Published

on

Interview With Bassist Travis Book

Interview With Bassist Travis Book…

Bluegrass music has had a very solid following over many years and I am always happy to hear from one of the pioneers in that genre.

Travis Book plays bass for the Grammy award-winning band “The Infamous Stringdusters” and has recently released his first solo album “Love and Other Strange Emotions”. As if he wasn’t busy enough, Travis also hosts a podcast, Plays a Jerry Garcia music show with Guitarist Andy Falco, and is constantly gigging locally in his neck of the woods.

Photo, Seyl Park

Visit Online:

www.thetravisbook.com
www.thestringdusters.com
FB @ TheTravisBook
IG @ travisbook

Continue Reading

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Facebook

Trending