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Berklee Bass Talk: Swinging With The Drummer– Push, Pull Or Line It Up?

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buddy-richBerklee Bass Talk: Swinging With The Drummer– Push, Pull Or Line It Up?

Ed Lucie is the Associate Professor of the Berklee College Of Music Bass Department, and he will be happy to answer your questions! So feel free to ask away, and we will forward your questions to Ed.

 

Q: When drummers swing, some play way on top of the beat, some pull way back, and others are somewhere in between. When playing a swing tune with a drummer, is it better for the bassist to push / pull in the opposite direction? For example, if the drummer is pushing it hard, is it better for the bassist to pull back? Or should the bassist try to swing with exactly the same feel as the drummer?

A:  This is an interesting question that I don’t think has one solid answer that applies to all situations. The bottom line is always to make the music and groove to feel good. I remember when I played with Buddy Rich he played ‘on top’ and  feathered his bass drum with ‘4 on the floor’. I had to lock in with his time and feel, there was no compromise. The result was a very powerful, forward feel to the groove. When I listen to Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb, the quarter notes on Cobb’s ride cymbal and PC’s quarter notes are perfectly lined up but in a relaxed way. Tony Williams and Ron Carter had something else going on, certainly together but looser.

More recent rhythm sections like Steve Swallow and Bill Stewart have perfect time (if that is possible) right in the ‘middle’ of the pulse, whereas John Patitucci and Brian Blade are feeling time together but not always stating it. So what is the answer? Listening; this is the key to finding your place with the drummer; the quarter note in the ride, the 2 and 4 on the high-hat. If he or she is on top or behind, I think we need to find a ‘middle’ but without fighting him. There is a difference between rushing and playing on top, and dragging or playing behind. If we find the middle then the groove will still have that forward motion and feel.

 

About Ed Lucie: In addition to being a Berklee professor and graduate, Ed has a Masters from the New England Conservatory Of Music. As a pro bassist, he has performed with Stevie Wonder, Buddy Rich, Warren Haynes & Gov’t Mule, Leo Nocentelli, and has performed both on Broadway and TV. You’ve heard him as a sideman on numerous albums, and perhaps have read his columns back when he was a contributing writer for Bass Player Magazine.

For more info on Ed Lucie, visit his Berklee page.

Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 6 

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James Rosocha

Approach Notes – Part 6 

As we move into lesson six of approach notes applied to chord tones, it’s important to go back and review the previous approaches. The constant review and application of these concepts will add a layer of chromaticism to both your bass lines and solos. The approaches need to be burned into your long term/ permanent memory for them to come out in your playing. 

This first example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic approach from below and a double chromatic approach from above approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, single from below and double chromatic from above to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down. 

The next example approaches the G major arpeggio in root position.

The next example approaches the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a single chromatic from below and a double chromatic approach from above -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down. 

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down. 

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, single from above/ double from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down.

After studying these various approach notes, you will begin to recognize the concepts utilized in your favorite solos. Continue the journey and good luck! 

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

Triads & Inversions Part I

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

It is very important for all bassists to understand and master the triads, but it is even more important to understand their different inversions.

In Part I, we are going to learn what the triad is in fundamental position.

The Formula consists of root, third and fifth.

Degrees of the Triad

Major Triad: 1 – 3 – 5
Minor Triad: 1 – b3 – 5
Diminished Triad: 1 – b3 – b5
Augmented Triad: 1 – 3 – #5

Fig.1 – The C, Cm, Cdim & Caug triads
(Fundamental Position)

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I
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Bass Videos

Have Fret Sprout? Sharp Fret Management… a How-To Video

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Have Fret Sprout? Sharp Fret Management... a How-To Video
PR Sample

Products courtesy of Music Nomad Equipment Care and Zymol

Have Fret Sprout? Check out this sharp fret management how-to video…

Have you found a bass you like but noticed the frets feel sharp? Have you ordered a bass online and discovered that the frets are sharp on your hands when it arrives? Have you picked up one of your favorite basses and noticed that the frets seem unusually sharper than they used to? You might be experiencing fret sprout!

Join me as I fix those pesky frets on one of my basses so you learn how to fix yours too.

www.musicnomadcare.com
www.zymol.com

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Bass Edu

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

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Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice's Bassist Lewis Bridges - From the Album, Grotesque

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

Bassist Lewis Bridges Shares…

“Gruesome’s sparse intro marks a stark contrast from the intensity of the rest of the album.  The original intention was to keep the bass simple but colourful, however as I worked on it, the lines grew more expressive and the more striking flourishes began to emerge.  The intensity builds into a harmonic minor passage that takes us into the drop — a signature death grind cacophony.  This is where Foetal Juice thrives.  You’re getting a full-on right-hand barrage to in the face to take you into a groove-laden mulch-fest.

I owe my throbbing bass tone to the Darkglass Alpha Omega pedal borrowed from our sound engineer, Chris Fielding (ex-Conan), mixed with the clarity of the tried and true Ampeg SVT CL.

As mentioned earlier, colourful basslines are important, especially in a one-guitar band. Chucking some funny intervals and odd flourishes here and there brings life into the brutality. There’s no point sounding brutal if it’s not gonna be fucking evil too!

Recording this playthrough was hard work. This was not the fault of James Goodwin (Necronautical), who was kindly filming and is ace to work with, but because in true Foetal fashion, we had stinking hangovers — and that jam room was hot!”

Follow Online

FB @FoetalJuice
TW @FoetalJuice
IG @foetaljuice
Youtube: @Foetaljuice
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Foetaljuice.bandcamp.com

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Bass Edu

Bass Lines: The Circle

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jaime Vazquez

Bass Lines: The Circle…

Hello bass players and fans of bass! This month we’re going to study “The Circle.”

The Circle of Fourths can also be called “The Circle of Fifths or just The Circle.

Practicing the scales, chords, and ideas in general via the circle has been a common practice routine for jazz musicians and highly recommended.

It is a disciplined way of working through all twelve keys.

Plus, many bass root movements to jazz and pop songs move through sections of the circle.

Fig. 1 – “The Circle”

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thecircle, #thecircleoffourths, #thecircleoffifths,#scales & #chords.

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