Connect with us

Bass Edu

Review – Double Bass Scales: The Play-Along Collection By Geoff Chalmers

Published

on

Review - Double Bass Scales: The Play-Along Collection By Geoff Chalmers

Double Bass Scales…

Discover Double Bass founder Geoff Chalmers has just released a great learning tool, Double Bass Scales, that at first seems applicable for upright bassists however, if you look under the hood you will find a wealth of material for electric players as well.

Discover Double Bass purports to be the largest online repository for learning the Double Bass with an internationally renowned faculty of instructors.

This play-along series offers you 1, 2 and 3-octave scales in the following denominations:

Aeolian Mode
Altered Scale
Blues Scale
Chromatic Scale
Dorian Mode
Major Pentatonic
Melodic Minor
Phrygian Mode
Whole Tone Scale

Half-Whole Diminished Scale
Harmonic Minor Scale
Ionian Mode
Locrian Mode
Lydian Mode
Minor Pentatonic
Mixolydian Mode
Whole-Half Diminished Scale

And along with all of these scales, there are accompanying mp3’s so you can HEAR exactly what they sound like.

This is a great primer for anyone who really wants to know their scales inside and out!

It is an interesting subject, the learning of scales and my philosophy may be a bit different because even though I play an upright, I am more of an electric player and primarily a six-string bass player so when I see a package like this my thoughts always turn to:

“How can I apply this to my playing?”

Ok… As an upright bassist, Geoff Chalmers gives you fingerings that are great for the upright bass but, if you dive deep into this, these same fingerings can be used on your electric bass as well, and since some of these fingerings are different than what an electric player would use, BAM! You’ve got alternatives that go up one way and down another and in 3 octaves!

Another thing about the upright that differs from the electric is, “Open strings are your friends!” On the upright, using the open strings is a big help with shifting through octaves from high to low and if you investigate going back to James Jamerson, who played the upright, he was very comfortable using the open strings in his basslines. A key point!

So, if you want to improve your facility with 17 scales and if you want to hear the sound of each of these scales, the included backing tracks with slow and fast versions of each scale played on a piano, including drone notes in 12 keys and a version of each scale played through the cycle of 5ths, I would highly recommend this package.

I think one of the major takeaways from this is, all materials are applicable to all musicians. All music whether it is written in bass clef or treble clef is applicable to all musicians. Never shy away from something because it is in a different clef. You never know what can spur your creativity forward!

To learn more, visit courses.discoverdoublebass.com

David C Gross has been the bassist for a lot of folks. He has written 14 bass books and 3 instructional videos, hosts “The Notes From An Artist Radio Show” on www.cygnusradio.com Monday nights 8 PM EDT, and the “Notes From An Artist” podcast available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcast platforms.

NFAA brings you behind the scenes with individuals who forged a timeless musical canon – spanning rock, jazz, funk, blues, folk, country, and permutations thereof. Listen to stories and anecdotes hitherto untold and relive more than a few chronicles that have become lore with a fresh vision. It’s the soundtrack of our lives. Celebrate the past, live in the present, and anticipate the future – take Notes From An Artist

You can contact David @ www.thebassguitarchannel.com/contact for more information regarding his online lessons and world-renown correspondence course.

Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 5

Published

on

James Rosocha

Continuing our lesson of Approach Notes, Part 5…

In continuing with the concept of approach notes being applied to chord tones, this lesson approaches the root, third, fifth, and seventh degree of each arpeggio inversion by incorporating a double chromatic approach from above, and a single chromatic approach from below. 

The first examples approach the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a double chromatic from above and a single chromatic approach from below -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down.

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, double chromatic from above/ single below to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down.

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down. 

This final example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above and below approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, double chromatic from above and below to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down.

Be sure to pace yourself with these lessons to avoid burning out.

Being overly ambitious with your practice schedule can lead to unrealistic expectations. Try learning one approach note concept and one chord type a week. Change your practice routine as necessary and tailor it to your needs as a musician. Good luck!

Continue Reading

Bass Edu

BASS LINES – The Blue Notes (Minor Blues Scale)

Published

on

jaime Vazquez

Hello bass players and bass fans! Happy New Year 2024!

In this issue, we are going to study the blue notes.

In blues, jazz, and rock, a blue note is a note that (for expressive purposes) is sung or played at a slightly different pitch from standard. Typically the alteration is between a quartertone and a semitone, but this varies depending on the musical context.

The blue notes are usually said to be the lowered third(b3), lowered fifth(b5) and lowered seventh(b7) scale degrees. The lowered fifth(b5) is also known as the raised fourth(#4). Though the blues scale has “an inherent minor tonality, it is commonly ‘forced’ over major-key chord changes, resulting in a distinctively dissonant conflict of tonalities”.

Blue notes are used in many blues songs, in jazz, rock and in conventional popular songs with a “blue” feeling.

Formula:

The A Minor Blues Scale

1 – b3 – 4 – (#4/b5) – 5 – b7

A – C – D – (D#/Eb) – E – Bb

The grades(blue notes):

b3, (#4/b5), b7

C, (D#/Eb), Bb

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thebluenotes, #minorbluesscale & #bluesscale

Continue Reading

Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Staccato for Bass

Published

on

jaime David

Staccato for Bass…

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the technique known as staccato.

When we talk about the staccato technique, we are referring to a form of musical articulation.

In modern notation, it signifies a note of shortened duration, separated from the note that may follow by silence.

* In 20th-century music, a dot placed above or below a note indicates that it should be played staccato.

* The opposite musical articulation of staccato is legato, signifying long and continuous notes.

Fig. 1 – An example of a normal notation.

Fig. 2 – Is the same example but now with the staccato articulation

Fig. 3 – A basic groove played and written in a normal notation.

Fig. 4 – The same basic groove using the staccato technique.

So, at the end of the day, you as a bassist will decide what type of technique you will use depending on the effect you want in your performance.

See you next year for more full bass attack!!! Happy Holidays & New Year 2024!!! Groove On!!!

Continue Reading

Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Legato Slide vs Shift Slide

Published

on

jaime Vazquez

Legato Slide vs Shift Slide…

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue we are going to study how to read the swing eighths.

When we talk about slide techniques, we are referring to what is known in classical music as the glissando.

• Glissando = a continuous slide upward or downward between two notes.

There are two types of slides, legato and shift.

Legato Slide = strike the first note and then slide the same fret-hand finger up or down to the second note. The second note is not struck.

Fig. 1 – Legato Slide – Upward

Fig. 2 – Legato Slide – Downward

Shift Slide = Same as Legato Slide, except the second note is struck.

Fig. 3 – Shift Slide – Upward

Fig. 4 – Shift Slide – Downward

So, at the end of the day, you as a bassist will decide what type of Slide you will use depending on the effect you want in your performance.

See you next month for more full bass attack!!! Groove On!!!

Continue Reading

Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 4

Published

on

James Rosocha

Bass Lesson: Part 4 of Approach Notes…

My previous lessons on the topic of approach notes covered approach notes from above, approach notes from below, and approach notes from below and above. This lesson flips the concept around to approach notes from above and below. Don’t make the mistake of only learning this material in the major keys. As a starting point, these exercises should be applied to major 7, minor 7, dominant 7, minor 7 b5, and diminished 7 in all 12 keys for all inversions. If you are just starting this lesson, I recommend you go back to my first lesson on approach notes and follow them in sequence. My lesson on arpeggio inversions lays the groundwork for the approach note concept to be applied. 

The first examples approach the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a double chromatic from above and below- before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, double chromatic from above and below to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down.

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, double chromatic from above and below to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down.

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, double chromatic from above and below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down. 

This final example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, double chromatic from above and below to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down.

These lessons take a very long time to complete so pace yourself and don’t give up. Good luck!

Continue Reading

Trending