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How Your Basslines Can Find Their Way Into Valuable Stock Music

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How Your Basslines Can Find Their Way Into Valuable Stock Music

Creating quality stock music is an essential part of any successful production library.

It requires skillful creativity, and it can be a great source of income for producers who put in the effort to develop quality beats and basslines. With the right knowledge, your basslines can find their way into valuable stock music that will bring you both recognition and a little financial reward.

In this article, we’ll look at some tips and tricks to help you make the most out of your basslines and create quality stock music. With a bit of hard work, creativity, and solid musical skills, you can create beats and rhythms that will stand out in the world of background and royalty-free music. Let’s get started!

Craft your basslines carefully.

Whether you are a novice or an expert who can play multiple instruments, crafting the perfect bassline is a necessary skill for creating great stock music. Start by thinking of your bass line as the foundation of your track. Establishing a well-crafted and strong groove is key, so take time to find the right notes that blend in seamlessly with your other instruments.

Additionally, consider using techniques such as effects and dynamics to give variation and make it sound richer as the listener progresses through the song idea. Making sure your bassline is balanced tone-wise will also drive your production to professional heights. In other words – don’t rush things when it comes to creating great stock music with the bass.

Record your basslines in a high-quality audio format.

Recording with a bass is a great way to make stock music, but it’s important to remember that quality sound always matters. It’s essential to guarantee your recordings come through in the highest possible audio quality if you want your tracks to be chosen by producers and others interested in stock music. To do this, make sure to record your basslines directly into a digital recording format. This ensures there are no changes in sound quality as the audio file is transferred between different systems.

Additionally, multitrack recording gives you more flexibility when mixing and editing your track—allowing for greater control of frequencies and dynamics when mastering the final version of your music. With these steps taken care of, you can create fantastic recordings full of depth and character with just one instrument, the bass guitar.

If you’re using a digital audio workstation (DAW), you may want to compare Logic Pro vs. Ableton Live. One of them is sure to become your favorite audio editing software, and over a million musicians can’t be wrong! For producers looking to craft the perfect stock music, it’s essential to determine which DAW works best for you. Both offer a variety of tools and features to help make producing high-quality tracks easier.

A MIDI programming paradigm is an ideal way to craft complex basslines and patterns that will add flavor to your stock music track. Once you understand the basics of MIDI programming, you can begin exploring its vast possibilities with just a few clicks of the mouse.

With Logic’s audio effects menus, you can achieve the perfect mix of compression, reverb, and EQ to get your bass lines sounding rich and full. Finally, Ableton Live’s suite of MIDI effects allows for detailed customization of your sounds. With Logic’s MIDI architecture, you can craft a unique bass line that rivals the traditional live instrument.

With audio units, MIDI FX, and plugins, you can create complex bass lines and melodies that will drive your creative production to the next level. With these resources at hand, you’re ready to record and mix the perfect stock music track that is sure to stand out from the rest of the field.

Edit your recorded basslines to make them sound exactly the way you want them to.

Once these recordings have been made, take the time to edit them until they sound exactly as you envisioned them when you first picked up your instrument. Cleaning up individual notes that may be off-key or adjusting the overall tone of a phrase by adding varying levels of distortion can help make your sound unique and moody.

For a fuller sound, consider re-amping through different amplifiers, which adds new elements and can open up creative possibilities. Finally, if you’re working with other instruments in your arrangement, add nuances within your part that blend well with the rest while still standing out on its own.

Create an arrangement for your bassline that fits the stock music format.

Creating a great stock music track using the bass guitar starts by having an arrangement that fits the stock music format. This involves composing music that can be used as part of music collaboration, whether it is background music to add energy to a soundtrack or rhythmic music that stands alone.

The easiest way to create a successful arrangement is to lay out different samples and patterns on the music production software of your choice. From there, you can craft riffs that make your bass line stand out while at the same time providing a steady backbeat for other tracks. Look into different music genres and philosophies to come up with meaningful music that your listener will appreciate and remember.

Finalize the mix of your track.

Once you have your catchy bass guitar composition for your stock music audio recording, the next step before finalizing it is to mix the track and make sure all its frequencies are balanced. EQ filters can be adjusted to reduce or increase certain sound frequencies while adding compression to fine-tune how loud certain sections of the track will be.

With each adjustment, always check how well it blends with the other elements in your score and make changes if needed. After adjusting all your levels and setting the desired volume, you’ll have a professional-sounding track ready to go out into the world.

Export the track as a high-quality audio file.

The trick is to make sure that whatever track you record comes out with a crisp and clear sound. Exporting the track as a high-quality audio file is an important part of this process, as it guarantees that your listeners will experience smooth sound quality and won’t miss out on any of the nuances of your track. Once you export your track in the highest quality possible, you can feel assured that your composition is getting its due.

Submit your bassline to stock music libraries.

First, familiarize yourself with the different types of licenses offered by stock music libraries and make sure that you have the right one before submitting any material. Additionally, always keep track of any changes or updates to library guidelines as well as other pieces of important legal information.

Finally, take the time to perfect each bassline to ensure that it meets quality control standards prior to submission. With these tips in mind, you can turn your creative ideas into something much larger than a single project.

The Bottom Line

Creating a professional-sounding bassline for stock music takes time, practice, and dedication. By following the steps outlined above, you can produce a polished and unique piece of work that will be sure to help get your name out there in the world of production music.

Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 6 

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James Rosocha

Approach Notes – Part 6 

As we move into lesson six of approach notes applied to chord tones, it’s important to go back and review the previous approaches. The constant review and application of these concepts will add a layer of chromaticism to both your bass lines and solos. The approaches need to be burned into your long term/ permanent memory for them to come out in your playing. 

This first example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic approach from below and a double chromatic approach from above approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, single from below and double chromatic from above to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down. 

The next example approaches the G major arpeggio in root position.

The next example approaches the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a single chromatic from below and a double chromatic approach from above -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down. 

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down. 

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, single from above/ double from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down.

After studying these various approach notes, you will begin to recognize the concepts utilized in your favorite solos. Continue the journey and good luck! 

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

Triads & Inversions Part I

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

It is very important for all bassists to understand and master the triads, but it is even more important to understand their different inversions.

In Part I, we are going to learn what the triad is in fundamental position.

The Formula consists of root, third and fifth.

Degrees of the Triad

Major Triad: 1 – 3 – 5
Minor Triad: 1 – b3 – 5
Diminished Triad: 1 – b3 – b5
Augmented Triad: 1 – 3 – #5

Fig.1 – The C, Cm, Cdim & Caug triads
(Fundamental Position)

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I
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Bass Edu

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

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Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice's Bassist Lewis Bridges - From the Album, Grotesque

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

Bassist Lewis Bridges Shares…

“Gruesome’s sparse intro marks a stark contrast from the intensity of the rest of the album.  The original intention was to keep the bass simple but colourful, however as I worked on it, the lines grew more expressive and the more striking flourishes began to emerge.  The intensity builds into a harmonic minor passage that takes us into the drop — a signature death grind cacophony.  This is where Foetal Juice thrives.  You’re getting a full-on right-hand barrage to in the face to take you into a groove-laden mulch-fest.

I owe my throbbing bass tone to the Darkglass Alpha Omega pedal borrowed from our sound engineer, Chris Fielding (ex-Conan), mixed with the clarity of the tried and true Ampeg SVT CL.

As mentioned earlier, colourful basslines are important, especially in a one-guitar band. Chucking some funny intervals and odd flourishes here and there brings life into the brutality. There’s no point sounding brutal if it’s not gonna be fucking evil too!

Recording this playthrough was hard work. This was not the fault of James Goodwin (Necronautical), who was kindly filming and is ace to work with, but because in true Foetal fashion, we had stinking hangovers — and that jam room was hot!”

Follow Online

FB @FoetalJuice
TW @FoetalJuice
IG @foetaljuice
Youtube: @Foetaljuice
Spotify
Foetaljuice.bandcamp.com

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Bass Edu

Bass Lines: The Circle

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jaime Vazquez

Bass Lines: The Circle…

Hello bass players and fans of bass! This month we’re going to study “The Circle.”

The Circle of Fourths can also be called “The Circle of Fifths or just The Circle.

Practicing the scales, chords, and ideas in general via the circle has been a common practice routine for jazz musicians and highly recommended.

It is a disciplined way of working through all twelve keys.

Plus, many bass root movements to jazz and pop songs move through sections of the circle.

Fig. 1 – “The Circle”

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thecircle, #thecircleoffourths, #thecircleoffifths,#scales & #chords.

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Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 5

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James Rosocha

Continuing our lesson of Approach Notes, Part 5…

In continuing with the concept of approach notes being applied to chord tones, this lesson approaches the root, third, fifth, and seventh degree of each arpeggio inversion by incorporating a double chromatic approach from above, and a single chromatic approach from below. 

The first examples approach the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a double chromatic from above and a single chromatic approach from below -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down.

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, double chromatic from above/ single below to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down.

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down. 

This final example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above and below approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, double chromatic from above and below to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down.

Be sure to pace yourself with these lessons to avoid burning out.

Being overly ambitious with your practice schedule can lead to unrealistic expectations. Try learning one approach note concept and one chord type a week. Change your practice routine as necessary and tailor it to your needs as a musician. Good luck!

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