Connect with us

Latest

Practice Session Tips

Published

on

In recent months I’ve been practicing a lot.  My father and I have spent a lot of time talking about Arnold Schultz and his techniques and concepts and some of it has resonated very strongly with me.

As I work on it, and as I record every practice session and listen to it, I continue to make interesting discoveries about my playing.  I think some of these things would be helpful for many other musicians so I thought I’d share a few.

My left hands leads. 
For many years I’d focused my attention on my right hand as the culprit for time and articulation issues.  I discussed it with Dave Weckl once and he suggested maybe it was my left hand.  After all this time it seems he was correct.  I’ve spent a lot of time practicing very softly, sometimes only articulating every 2 or 3 notes in the course of a fast passage (say 8th notes at ¼ note=300bpm) and realized that my left hand was kind off in…well…left field.  After clearing the confusion the right hand was causing out of the equation I was able to hone in on the left hand and realized that it hadn’t been carrying it’s own weight at all.  Now that I’ve brought the left hand into it’s proper role in the big picture, my right hand is left to play loud or soft, staccato or legato, warm or harsh…whatever.  It also really evens out the notes when you’re playing lines that are part right-hand articulated, and part hammered.  For me…for now…this starts happening once I exceed 1/8th notes at 1/4=300~320bpm.

Account for every note.  This is something else Weckl brought up with me and one of Anthony Jackson’s mantras.  I understood, of course, but was never able to wrap myself around the applied reality of it.  Now I see, though.  In the context of the Schultz paradigm, the consciousness is the conductor of what you do, and the motor nervous system is the executor.  In other words, you may consciously will a result, but the task of actually doing it needs to be delegated to the motor nervous system in order be done with accuracy and predictability.  In fact, this seems to me to be an absolute truth.  It’s hard to accept that we don’t directly consciously control our muscles…but we don’t.  Anyway, another thing the conscious mind does WHEN IMPROVISING in particular, is to establish WHAT to play and sort of reconcile it with the music.  I’ve been amazed at times when I’ve played lately that even in the context of an extremely fast or complicated line, I’m consciously aware of every single note that I’m GOING to play a split second before I play it.  Not groups or patterns, but every single detail.  This doesn’t happen constantly and in every situation yet as I haven’t really nailed the nervous coordination yet.  My goal is to be able to do that with everything all the time.

Legato seems to be the path to control.  For me, once I’m cool to play something very legato and perfectly in time, I can put any kind of articulation, dynamics, feel, etc. on it.  This is, again, more of a left hand issue.  Regardless of how you time the plucking of the note with the right hand, your left hand has to hold a note down as long as is possible before the next note is struck.  I know, it seems intuitive.  But when you’re really wailing around, the notes tend to get shorter because, I think, of an urgency to get the note sounded and get to the next one in time.  That tends to leave you relegated to playing the note however you can get it played, which often means the note name is the only factor that plays into your musical statement.  I believe this is part of where Victor Wooten is coming from with his “2 through 10” concept which points out to players that just the note name itself has only a small role in music.  Integrating other factors like articulation, dynamics, timbre, feel (and 5 more that I can’t remember…sorry Vic), and more specifically variations thereof, give the music much more meaning.

I hope this is helpful for somebody.  Keep working and remember, there’s no substitute for knowing what you’re doing!

Bass Videos

Gear News: Future Impact V4 Guitar & Bass Synth Now Available in the U.S.

Published

on

Future Impact V4 Guitar & Bass Synth

Future Impact V4 Guitar & Bass Synth Now Available in the U.S….

The Future Impact V4 is an incredibly versatile pedal with an exceptionally wide range of sounds. In addition to producing synthesizer sounds such as basses, leads and pads, it can function as an octaver, chorus, flanger, phaser, distortion, envelope filter, traditional wah-wah, tremolo, reverb, etc., and even has a built-in tuner. It can also drive external synthesizer gear via the optional CV/Gate. As such, it can potentially replace an entire pedalboard of dedicated single-effect pedals. 

The very powerful signal processor of the Future Impact V4 is able to replicate the various oscillator, filter, amplifier and envelope generator blocks found in classic synthesizers. In addition, it contains signal processing blocks more traditionally used for processing the sound of an instrument such as a harmonizer block and audio effects such as chorus, distortion and EQ. These architectures complement each other in a very flexible way.

Check out this short video with new sounds:

The Future Impact V4 has a completely new hardware platform with numerous enhancements, some of which are:

– 32-bit ultra-low-noise analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters
– New app-based software architecture 
– Vastly advanced pitch tracking based on 30+ years of experience
– Hard Sync between oscillators to open new sonic worlds
– On-pedal edits that can be saved into program memories
– Total compatibility with all previous Deep Impact and Future Impact patches

Setting the standard for the bass guitar synth pedals since 2015, together with an enthusiastic community and long line of great artists, the Future Impact V4 is the guitar synth platform for the next decade. 

For more information, visit online at pandamidi.com/bass-guitar-synth

Exclusive U.S. distribution by Tech 21 USA, Inc

Continue Reading

Latest

July 8 – This Week’s Top 10 Basses on Instagram

Published

on

TOP 10 Basses of the week

Check out our top 10 favorite basses on Instagram this week…

Click to follow Bass Musician on Instagram @bassmusicianmag

FEATURED @bqwbassguitar @anacondabasses @ramabass.ok @gvguitars @dmarkguitars @fernando.petry.bass @bassnsoulgear @chris_seldon_guitars @overwaterbasses @officialspector

View More Bass Gear News

Continue Reading

Gear News

New Gear: Cort Introduces the New Artisan C4/C5 Deluxe Bass Guitars

Published

on

New Gear: Cort Introduces the New Artisan C4/C5 Deluxe Bass Guitars

Cort Introduces the New Artisan C4/C5 Deluxe Bass Guitars…

Cort Guitars creates instruments that musicians love to play. The Artisan Series is for the bass player who knows the value of playing a tone-rich, affordable bass guitar that can hold up the back end. Cort Guitars launches the next phase of the series: The Artisan C Deluxe.

The Artisan C Deluxe was created with the serious bass player in mind. It is a bolt-on beauty made of lightweight poplar that allows for ease of playability with all the robust tone Cort basses are known for. The Artisan C4 and C5 Deluxe boast a pristine Hard maple neck with jatoba fretboard, 24 frets with White Dot inlays, and a 34” scale length. One more feature is the 18mm string spacing at the bridge on the C5 making playability a breeze for all styles.

This workhorse of a bass guitar comes in an array of gorgeous colors: Candy Red, Candy Blue, and Black, all tricked out with black hardware to easily stand out on stage and in front of the crowd. Bartolini® MK-1 pickups pack a punch with unparalleled clarity. A Markbass® MB-1 preamp controls Bass, Mid, Treble, Master Volume, Pickup Balancer, and an active/passive switch to manage all of the grooves and low end. The MetalCraft M4 Bridge offers better body contact and transfer of tone. Its dual-string loading system makes for easy string changes, either from the top or through the body. D’Addario® EXL165 strings complete this stellar instrument.

The Artisan C Deluxe is the go-to bass for any bass player looking to upgrade their instrument in looks and playability. No matter the genre, the Artisan C Deluxe outperforms the competition. To see the Artisan C4 Deluxe and Artisan C5 Deluxe, visit www.cortguitars.com.

Artisan C4 Deluxe Street Price: $449.00 USD
Artisan C5 Deluxe Street Price: $499.00 USD

Continue Reading

Bass Videos

Working-Class Zeros: Episode #4 – Boutique and Vintage Basses, Dress Code for Summer Gigs

Published

on

WORKING-CLASS ZEROS With Steve Rosati and Shawn Cav

Here is episode 4 of WCZ, we discuss boutique and vintage basses in the working-class gig world, as well as navigating the heat and dress code for outdoor summer gigs. Plus another installment of ‘Sure it’s awesome but, is it necessary?’

These stories from the front are with real-life, day-to-day musicians who deal with work life and gigging and how they make it work out. Each month, topics may include… the kind of gigs you get, the money, dealing with less-than-ideal rooms, as well as the gear you need to get the job done… and the list goes on from there.” – Steve the Bass Guy and Shawn Cav

Continue Reading

Latest

Jul 1 – This Week’s Top 10 Basses on Instagram

Published

on

TOP 10 Basses of the week

Check out our top 10 favorite basses on Instagram this week…

Click to follow Bass Musician on Instagram @bassmusicianmag

FEATURED @adamovicbasses @jermsbass @astluthier @cb_basses @officialspector @marleaux_bassguitars @lecomptebass @ramabass.ok @mattissonbass @mauriziouberbasses

View More Bass Gear News

Continue Reading