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Victor Wooten’s Sex in a Pan

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Victor Wooten's Sex in a Pan

A full tutorial on Victor Wooten’s Sex in a Pan!

Anybody who does not know Vic? Okay… So you have also read my report on Vic’s Workshop and now you’ll see a full tutorial on Sex in a Pan, one of my favorites from him. Instead of making more short videos, now I decided to make one longer vid and break down the major parts of the whole song – so here it is! Enjoy it!

This song reflects the natural playfulness and the joyful wisdom of Vic himself  while really making your ass move to it… it is THE flow 🙂 To be honest, while the song is quite techincal in a way, I cannot really think (or talk) about it that way, it is more like a feeling : )When you first try to play it, it will feel like juggling – coordinating all the fingers together to make it flow and feel good takes some practice but the more you do it, the more you enjoy it, and the better you play.

Trust me, learning this piece is a real therapy experience 🙂 The therapy includes little tapping, playing chords and double-stops, using dead, muted and accented notes, using that many fingers on your hands you never used before, intense left hand hammering, light slapping with double-thumbing.

The intro… besides the big stretch and the sliding right hand middle finger tap, there is one more thing to the intro part: the harmonics are hard to get when you release the right middle finger – your left hand has to fret two notes and just hover over some notes on the G string so lifting your right middle finger will produce the desired harmonic note… so it is kind of tricky, Vic magically brings them ringing everytime but well, if you can live without it just do so 🙂

The verse… the fun part. All of it is played sort of palm muted, for that, just place the side of your hand towards the bridge and play like that.When you play this groove, think of space and let the open strings breath and when your left hand has to hammer that 7th fret on the E string – be gentle and do not choke that open string too early. Otherwise – happy jugglin with all your fingers 🙂 On the notation – P means the thumb, I means the index finger, M means the middle finger, T means right hand tap. On the left hand: 1 means left hand index, 4 means left hand pinky and when you can see those, usually you do not have to pick that note with your right hand!. Hope you can sort it out while watching it 🙂

The refrain… further finger coordination, and sliding double-stops. In the tab, you can see rest after the first slide, but note that there is a rhytmic right hand tap on the vide – I have seen Vic play that live sometimes.

The break in G… another fun part – I am still trying to figure out the descending pattern that Vic does recently but until then, here is how I think he played it on the record. Not as many right hand slap as you would think – that’s a good left hand finger-strengthener with the hammer-ons 🙂

So, if you reached that level, you are ready for the last part, the slap-style variation on the verse: if you watch Vic live, this part is played with a very light slapping-thumbing sort of playing – note that on the G and D string he uses double-thump style slapping while on the E and A string he only goes down with his thumb – it is barely slapping and it is a very natural motion – remember the economy of motion that all those pro players talk about!

So that’s it: if you have further questions, just shoot in the comments!

The video does not intend to violate any laws or copyrights, it is to be used for educational purposes (fair use). The original song is available for purchase and listening at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/greatest-hits-20th-century/id358187446

Visit Vic’s site and support him!

http://www.victorwooten.com/

For members, here is the GuitarPro5 file!

Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 5

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James Rosocha

Continuing our lesson of Approach Notes, Part 5…

In continuing with the concept of approach notes being applied to chord tones, this lesson approaches the root, third, fifth, and seventh degree of each arpeggio inversion by incorporating a double chromatic approach from above, and a single chromatic approach from below. 

The first examples approach the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a double chromatic from above and a single chromatic approach from below -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down.

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, double chromatic from above/ single below to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down.

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above/ single from below approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, double chromatic from above/ single from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down. 

This final example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio.

A double chromatic from above and below approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, double chromatic from above and below to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down.

Be sure to pace yourself with these lessons to avoid burning out.

Being overly ambitious with your practice schedule can lead to unrealistic expectations. Try learning one approach note concept and one chord type a week. Change your practice routine as necessary and tailor it to your needs as a musician. Good luck!

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES – The Blue Notes (Minor Blues Scale)

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jaime Vazquez

Hello bass players and bass fans! Happy New Year 2024!

In this issue, we are going to study the blue notes.

In blues, jazz, and rock, a blue note is a note that (for expressive purposes) is sung or played at a slightly different pitch from standard. Typically the alteration is between a quartertone and a semitone, but this varies depending on the musical context.

The blue notes are usually said to be the lowered third(b3), lowered fifth(b5) and lowered seventh(b7) scale degrees. The lowered fifth(b5) is also known as the raised fourth(#4). Though the blues scale has “an inherent minor tonality, it is commonly ‘forced’ over major-key chord changes, resulting in a distinctively dissonant conflict of tonalities”.

Blue notes are used in many blues songs, in jazz, rock and in conventional popular songs with a “blue” feeling.

Formula:

The A Minor Blues Scale

1 – b3 – 4 – (#4/b5) – 5 – b7

A – C – D – (D#/Eb) – E – Bb

The grades(blue notes):

b3, (#4/b5), b7

C, (D#/Eb), Bb

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thebluenotes, #minorbluesscale & #bluesscale

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Staccato for Bass

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jaime David

Staccato for Bass…

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the technique known as staccato.

When we talk about the staccato technique, we are referring to a form of musical articulation.

In modern notation, it signifies a note of shortened duration, separated from the note that may follow by silence.

* In 20th-century music, a dot placed above or below a note indicates that it should be played staccato.

* The opposite musical articulation of staccato is legato, signifying long and continuous notes.

Fig. 1 – An example of a normal notation.

Fig. 2 – Is the same example but now with the staccato articulation

Fig. 3 – A basic groove played and written in a normal notation.

Fig. 4 – The same basic groove using the staccato technique.

So, at the end of the day, you as a bassist will decide what type of technique you will use depending on the effect you want in your performance.

See you next year for more full bass attack!!! Happy Holidays & New Year 2024!!! Groove On!!!

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Legato Slide vs Shift Slide

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jaime Vazquez

Legato Slide vs Shift Slide…

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue we are going to study how to read the swing eighths.

When we talk about slide techniques, we are referring to what is known in classical music as the glissando.

• Glissando = a continuous slide upward or downward between two notes.

There are two types of slides, legato and shift.

Legato Slide = strike the first note and then slide the same fret-hand finger up or down to the second note. The second note is not struck.

Fig. 1 – Legato Slide – Upward

Fig. 2 – Legato Slide – Downward

Shift Slide = Same as Legato Slide, except the second note is struck.

Fig. 3 – Shift Slide – Upward

Fig. 4 – Shift Slide – Downward

So, at the end of the day, you as a bassist will decide what type of Slide you will use depending on the effect you want in your performance.

See you next month for more full bass attack!!! Groove On!!!

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Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 4

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James Rosocha

Bass Lesson: Part 4 of Approach Notes…

My previous lessons on the topic of approach notes covered approach notes from above, approach notes from below, and approach notes from below and above. This lesson flips the concept around to approach notes from above and below. Don’t make the mistake of only learning this material in the major keys. As a starting point, these exercises should be applied to major 7, minor 7, dominant 7, minor 7 b5, and diminished 7 in all 12 keys for all inversions. If you are just starting this lesson, I recommend you go back to my first lesson on approach notes and follow them in sequence. My lesson on arpeggio inversions lays the groundwork for the approach note concept to be applied. 

The first examples approach the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a double chromatic from above and below- before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, double chromatic from above and below to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down.

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, double chromatic from above and below to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down.

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, double chromatic from above and below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down. 

This final example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. A double chromatic from above and below approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, double chromatic from above and below to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down.

These lessons take a very long time to complete so pace yourself and don’t give up. Good luck!

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