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Bass Edu

Victor Wooten’s Sex in a Pan

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Victor Wooten's Sex in a Pan

A full tutorial on Victor Wooten’s Sex in a Pan!

Anybody who does not know Vic? Okay… So you have also read my report on Vic’s Workshop and now you’ll see a full tutorial on Sex in a Pan, one of my favorites from him. Instead of making more short videos, now I decided to make one longer vid and break down the major parts of the whole song – so here it is! Enjoy it!

This song reflects the natural playfulness and the joyful wisdom of Vic himself  while really making your ass move to it… it is THE flow 🙂 To be honest, while the song is quite techincal in a way, I cannot really think (or talk) about it that way, it is more like a feeling : )When you first try to play it, it will feel like juggling – coordinating all the fingers together to make it flow and feel good takes some practice but the more you do it, the more you enjoy it, and the better you play.

Trust me, learning this piece is a real therapy experience 🙂 The therapy includes little tapping, playing chords and double-stops, using dead, muted and accented notes, using that many fingers on your hands you never used before, intense left hand hammering, light slapping with double-thumbing.

The intro… besides the big stretch and the sliding right hand middle finger tap, there is one more thing to the intro part: the harmonics are hard to get when you release the right middle finger – your left hand has to fret two notes and just hover over some notes on the G string so lifting your right middle finger will produce the desired harmonic note… so it is kind of tricky, Vic magically brings them ringing everytime but well, if you can live without it just do so 🙂

The verse… the fun part. All of it is played sort of palm muted, for that, just place the side of your hand towards the bridge and play like that.When you play this groove, think of space and let the open strings breath and when your left hand has to hammer that 7th fret on the E string – be gentle and do not choke that open string too early. Otherwise – happy jugglin with all your fingers 🙂 On the notation – P means the thumb, I means the index finger, M means the middle finger, T means right hand tap. On the left hand: 1 means left hand index, 4 means left hand pinky and when you can see those, usually you do not have to pick that note with your right hand!. Hope you can sort it out while watching it 🙂

The refrain… further finger coordination, and sliding double-stops. In the tab, you can see rest after the first slide, but note that there is a rhytmic right hand tap on the vide – I have seen Vic play that live sometimes.

The break in G… another fun part – I am still trying to figure out the descending pattern that Vic does recently but until then, here is how I think he played it on the record. Not as many right hand slap as you would think – that’s a good left hand finger-strengthener with the hammer-ons 🙂

So, if you reached that level, you are ready for the last part, the slap-style variation on the verse: if you watch Vic live, this part is played with a very light slapping-thumbing sort of playing – note that on the G and D string he uses double-thump style slapping while on the E and A string he only goes down with his thumb – it is barely slapping and it is a very natural motion – remember the economy of motion that all those pro players talk about!

So that’s it: if you have further questions, just shoot in the comments!

The video does not intend to violate any laws or copyrights, it is to be used for educational purposes (fair use). The original song is available for purchase and listening at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/greatest-hits-20th-century/id358187446

Visit Vic’s site and support him!

http://www.victorwooten.com/

For members, here is the GuitarPro5 file!

Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part II

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part II

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

In the last lesson, we were studying triads in their fundamental position. This time, we are going to study what is known as the first inversion of the triads.

The first inversion consists of the third going on the bass in the triad, as we will see below:

C Major Triad (1st inversion)
E – G – B
C Minor Triad (1st inversion)
Eb – G – B
C Diminished Triad (1st inversion)
Eb – Gb – C
C Augmented Triad (1st inversion)
E – G# – C

See you next month for Part III… GROOVE ON!!!

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Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 6 

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James Rosocha

Approach Notes – Part 6 

As we move into lesson six of approach notes applied to chord tones, it’s important to go back and review the previous approaches. The constant review and application of these concepts will add a layer of chromaticism to both your bass lines and solos. The approaches need to be burned into your long term/ permanent memory for them to come out in your playing. 

This first example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic approach from below and a double chromatic approach from above approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, single from below and double chromatic from above to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down. 

The next example approaches the G major arpeggio in root position.

The next example approaches the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a single chromatic from below and a double chromatic approach from above -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down. 

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down. 

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, single from above/ double from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down.

After studying these various approach notes, you will begin to recognize the concepts utilized in your favorite solos. Continue the journey and good luck! 

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

Triads & Inversions Part I

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

It is very important for all bassists to understand and master the triads, but it is even more important to understand their different inversions.

In Part I, we are going to learn what the triad is in fundamental position.

The Formula consists of root, third and fifth.

Degrees of the Triad

Major Triad: 1 – 3 – 5
Minor Triad: 1 – b3 – 5
Diminished Triad: 1 – b3 – b5
Augmented Triad: 1 – 3 – #5

Fig.1 – The C, Cm, Cdim & Caug triads
(Fundamental Position)

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I
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Bass Edu

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

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Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice's Bassist Lewis Bridges - From the Album, Grotesque

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

Bassist Lewis Bridges Shares…

“Gruesome’s sparse intro marks a stark contrast from the intensity of the rest of the album.  The original intention was to keep the bass simple but colourful, however as I worked on it, the lines grew more expressive and the more striking flourishes began to emerge.  The intensity builds into a harmonic minor passage that takes us into the drop — a signature death grind cacophony.  This is where Foetal Juice thrives.  You’re getting a full-on right-hand barrage to in the face to take you into a groove-laden mulch-fest.

I owe my throbbing bass tone to the Darkglass Alpha Omega pedal borrowed from our sound engineer, Chris Fielding (ex-Conan), mixed with the clarity of the tried and true Ampeg SVT CL.

As mentioned earlier, colourful basslines are important, especially in a one-guitar band. Chucking some funny intervals and odd flourishes here and there brings life into the brutality. There’s no point sounding brutal if it’s not gonna be fucking evil too!

Recording this playthrough was hard work. This was not the fault of James Goodwin (Necronautical), who was kindly filming and is ace to work with, but because in true Foetal fashion, we had stinking hangovers — and that jam room was hot!”

Follow Online

FB @FoetalJuice
TW @FoetalJuice
IG @foetaljuice
Youtube: @Foetaljuice
Spotify
Foetaljuice.bandcamp.com

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Bass Edu

Bass Lines: The Circle

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jaime Vazquez

Bass Lines: The Circle…

Hello bass players and fans of bass! This month we’re going to study “The Circle.”

The Circle of Fourths can also be called “The Circle of Fifths or just The Circle.

Practicing the scales, chords, and ideas in general via the circle has been a common practice routine for jazz musicians and highly recommended.

It is a disciplined way of working through all twelve keys.

Plus, many bass root movements to jazz and pop songs move through sections of the circle.

Fig. 1 – “The Circle”

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thecircle, #thecircleoffourths, #thecircleoffifths,#scales & #chords.

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