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IK Multimedia Releases iRig Keys I/O

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November 16, 2017 – IK Multimedia is proud to announce that iRig Keys I/O, the revolutionary keyboard controller range featuring a built-in audio interface, is now shipping worldwide. iRig Keys I/O is much more than just a simple controller, it is a true studio centerpiece providing users with a flexible way to complete their music productions from start to end using a single piece of equipment that is unmatched for speed and simplicity of use. iRig Keys I/O comes with either 25 or 49 full-size keys offering a synth-action keybed and integrates a professional, high-definition 96kHz/24-bit audio interface with a high-performance Class A preamp allowing users to record their instruments and microphones (including condenser mics requiring 48V phantom power) via its convenient combo 1/4″/XLR input. Plus, it provides all the creative controls expected from a premium keyboard controller such as velocity sensitive, multicolored pads, programmable touch-sensitive sliders, buttons and assignable knobs.

Built-in professional audio interface for studio quality sound

iRig Keys I/O is the only keyboard controller range currently available on the market to feature an integrated professional 96kHz/24-bit audio interface. The intelligent, elegant layout makes it possible to keep all cabling to a minimum and makes setting up as fast and easy as just plug and play. The combo input sports a high-quality Class A preamp and accepts both 1/4″ and XLR sources including dynamic and condenser microphones (with 48V phantom power), line instruments, guitars and basses. When used live, the 1/4″ balanced stereo output can be used to run the signal directly to a PA or mixer. All of this makes iRig Keys I/O the ideal creative tool for studio or live use, in any situation, providing a solution that is more convenient and affordable than having to purchase a controller and audio interface separately.

Full control at the touch of a finger

iRig Keys I/O represents a huge step forward and introduces the next generation of IK keyboards. Both models feature a fast synth-action keybed, a volume/data push knob, 4 touch-sensitive knobs in 2 banks (acting as 8 total controls) and 8 multicolored LED-lit velocity sensitive pads. There are also 2 fully programmable touch control strips, set by default as Pitch and Modulation controls and a complete touch sensitive transport and button section, for a true “hands-on” approach to controlling all the most important functions of a DAW or virtual instrument. All available controls exploit the latest-generation capacitive technology for ultra-fast action and immediate feedback, displaying the related parameter value at the touch of a finger for instant visual reference.

True plug-and-play

iRig Keys I/O is Apple certified MFi hardware (Made for iPhone and iPad) which means it works right out of the box with all iOS devices with a Lightning port, including the latest iPhone. The included Lightning cable allows for easy connection to iOS devices while the included USB cable connects to Mac and PC computers. iRig Keys I/O works seamlessly with the most popular Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs) like Logic Pro®, Ableton® Live™, GarageBand® and many others.

The traveling producer’s dream

iRig Keys I/O 25 & 49 are the smallest controllers with full-size keys on the market today and are 25% lighter than the nearest competitor. This is a great advantage when working on the road, in small studios or in any environment where space is at a premium. Their design makes them also ideal for the traveling musician/producer who demands utmost portability but without sacrificing performance. Furthermore, iRig Keys I/O can be powered via USB, using an optional external power supply (that simultaneously charges the connected iOS device) or with 4 AA batteries, for complete mobile music production. For added convenience there are travel bags, available separately, for carrying the 25 key and 49 key versions of iRig Keys I/O. For recording vocals on the go, iRig Keys I/O Mic (sold separately), is a gooseneck condenser microphone that plugs directly into the input jack eliminating the need for a stand.

Full suite of professional software included

With over $/€550 (in the 25-key version) and $/€750 (in the 49-key version) worth of IK’s professional software and apps included, iRig Keys I/O provides users with everything they need to start, develop and complete their musical productions from A to Z, both inside a professional DAW or using recording software like GarageBand®. Included in both versions of iRig Keys I/O is Ableton® Live 9 Lite™ digital audio workstation, IK’s SampleTank 3 sound and groove workstation, with over 43GB and 5000 inspiring sounds, T-RackS 4 Deluxe mix and mastering suite, with 9 powerful EQ and dynamics processors and the Pro-V vintage synthesizer, which is derived from Syntronik, IK’s legendary synth powerhouse for Mac/PC. iPhone and iPad users will also receive the full version of SampleTank. Additionally, the 49-key version comes with Miroslav Philharmonik 2 CE orchestral workstation for Mac/PC and the mobile edition for iOS.

Pricing and availability

iRig Keys I/O is available from the IK Multimedia online store and IK authorized dealers worldwide for just $/€299.99* for the 49-key version and $/€199.99 for the 25-key version. In addition to the massive bundle of included software, iRig Keys I/O comes with 4 x AA batteries, Mini-DIN to USB and Mini-DIN to Lightning cables and a device stand for iPhone and iPad.

* All prices excluding taxes

For more information, please visit: www.irigkeys.io

For a video of iRig Keys I/O, please visit: www.irigkeys.io/video

Features

Gear News: Bergantino Welcomes Marc Brownstein to Their Family of Artists

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bassist marc browstein

Bergantino Welcomes Marc Brownstein to Their Family of Artists

Bergantino Shares: The innovative bassist/sonic explorer/DJ Marc Brownstein discusses his life of touring with Disco Biscuits, the current tour with the new album “Revolution in Motion, and more!

By Holly Bergantino

Marc Brownstein is the king of “Trance-Fusion” – a subgenre that his band Disco Biscuits has been in the center of for the past two decades. As a founding member of the band from their days at UPenn, Marc has quite the experience under his belt, and each tour has gotten more and more exciting. Disco Biscuits is currently on tour with their new album Revolution in Motion, a full multimedia experience accompanied by a 25-minute animated film that tells a story of intergalactic travelers finding their way on Earth. 

D. J. Brownie! What made you want to be a musician and start playing bass and who drew you to it? 

I was drawn to music after John Lennon was assassinated. I was raised in NYC and the city was just going crazy. I was 7 years old at the time and my thought was, wow why is everyone freaking out so much, this guy must be really special. And so I started to check the Beatles out and that was the beginning of my journey with music.  

A question from one of your fans and fellow bass players Karina Rykman: “How do you keep your bubble of positivity intact and thriving”?

Well it’s funny she should ask. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the run of positivity we are experiencing now began right at the beginning of tour at the beginning of January 2023 when we had Karina opening for us for a week. I can say that her positive energy on tour definitely left its mark on the rest of our tour. Some people are so naturally happy and positive that it leaves you feeling that way, sometimes permanently! 

Besides the bass guitar, what other instruments do you play? 

I dabble with piano, guitar, and I can make my way around a drum kit if I get into it for a few weeks. I’ve played flute and saxophone as well at different times. I also play the double bass. But I would say Piano is my second instrument at this point. I play everyday. 

What is your favorite (and least favorite) thing about touring? 

The best part of touring is the 4 hours on stage with the band. But also getting to visit so many great places all of the time. That’s the silver lining.  The only thing I don’t love about touring is missing my family. 

Tell us about your first music teacher. What lesson did you learn from this person and still use today? 

My first music teacher, Mrs. Koslov, 2nd grade, I just was at her funeral a few weeks ago. I eventually became best friends with Mrs Koslov’s son and we stayed in touch for my whole life. She taught me a lot but really she was the one who gave me the courage to perform. My first public performance ever was a piano version of Eleanor Rigby. 

What was the first bass you had? 

This is tough. I think I had a standard Ibanez jazz style bass first. Within a year or two I got an American Fender Jazz bass. 

What are the basses you have and use now? 

My main bass is an Elrick 5 string by Rob Elrick. I also have a Q5 Modulus and an Alembic 5 as well. Oteil (Burbridge) sent me a Roscoe custom 6 during the Pandemic that I like to play. I also have a Sire Marcus Miller, a newer American Fender Jazz bass, a custom Ibanez SDGR, an Ibanez BTB and an Elrick 5 string Fretless bass which is my main bass at home. 

Who were the musicians who inspired you and what qualities do you admire about them? 

I was deeply influenced by Phish when I discovered them in college. I admired their ability to mesh jazz, classical and rock Improvisational styles. I was very inspired by classic jazz musicians. Miles. Monk. Coltrane. Dexter Gordon. Cannonball Adderly. Mingus. This is the generation of musicians that laid the groundwork for what we do now. 

You studied and started the band Disco Biscuits at UPenn. Tell us more about the origins. 

The band just sort of linked up in the quad (dormitory) and we started to set up our gear and jam for fun. Within a short time I realized the guys I was playing with were really talented and so I applied to the New School for jazz and went and spent a year crash coursing music at a high level so I could return to Penn and start a band with them. 

You have a new album “Revolution in Motion,” that you’re currently touring on. How is it going? 

The tour has been amazing. It’s one of the best tours we ever had in our career. We sold out more than half of the shows and are receiving really great feedback across the country. 

I watched the video on YT for Revolution in Motion. The Choreography, production, color, cartoon characters, and theme were so much fun. Space aliens and psychedelic art, pop ups like a comic book, and you in your alien jump suit with your baseball cap were amazing. Loved! How was this collaborated?  

We have a co-writer on this project named Joey friedman. He conceived of the concept for the album and he had a very specific vision for what the visuals would look like. He spent hours and hours with the animators (Blunt Action) and the AI animator (Todd Kushnir) working through each iteration to make it come to life in the way that it was conceived. 

How would you describe the music you create for Disco Biscuits? 

We always hoped that the music we created would be the weirdest and craziest music of all time but we describe it as Trance-Fusion, which was a name that was drawn from jazz-fusion, the mixing of jazz with rock and roll instruments. We found our own sound by mixing trance music with rock and roll instruments, hence the genre title. It was renamed jamtronica many years later by the folks over at SiriusXM who started a radio show called the Jamtronica show to highlight acts from our scene. I was the host of that show for the first 3 years. 

Describe the creative process when you write new music. 

These days the creative process is a team effort. Usually we start by combing through improvisational sections of music from the tours to see if we can find any melodies or chord structures that are song worthy. When we find it we bring it into our DAW (ableton) and creating a grid. This is easy for us because we often play to a time clock on stage. From there we start building out the structures of the new piece of music while Joey and maybe me or Aron or Jon will start working on some lyrical concepts. Within an hour or two we start to record some of these initial lyrics and melodies and Jon usually starts to adapt them and tweak them to make them comfortable for him to sing. Usually within a few hours we are able to walk away with a very advanced demo of a new song. It’s been an extremely fruitful experience that has left us with albums worth of the best material we’ve had in decades. 

The lighting for your shows is amazing. Who does the lighting design work and choreography for the tours? 

Our new LD is known as Herm, but his name is Alex. We know him as Herm though. He came to us from the band Twiddle at the beginning of this year and has totally revitalized the visual elements of the stage show. He’s a really great fit and we feel grateful to have been linked up with such a massive talent. It was luck and timing and some might call it fate. 

How would your bandmates describe you? 

My bandmates would probably describe me as energetic and talkative and headstrong but also they might notice that I’ve become really good at going with the flow and backing their creative instincts. They may further describe me as anxious and nervous but may also notice that these elements have been remediated of recent. Mostly I think they would describe me as loyal and dedicated. 

How did you find Bergantino Audio systems? 

I was first introduced to it by Ed Grasmeyer who I know as Mike Gordon’s tech in Burlington. I was playing a show at Nectars and needed a backline and Ed came and set me up with the ForteHP2 and I was blown away by the tone. I then noticed Karina Rykman was using Bergantino as well and that’s when I started to think I needed to get in contact with the company. Karina was opening for the Biscuits on Boston and that’s where I had the chance to demo the forte hp2 in the context of the biscuits stage show. I haven’t looked back since that night. 

Tell us about your experience with the Forté HP2 on the tour? 

There are so many things that I can say about it but the most notable is that I’m not struggling to hear the frequencies that I want to hear on stage anymore. I used to have to boost the bass everywhere. In an EQ pedal, on the preamp on the actual bass. But every time you add a little of those low frequencies in those other places you risk degrading the tone of the signal. With the Forte HP2 there is a punch button that gives me exactly the frequency I’m looking for. 100 hz. 4 db. It’s perfect. 

Did you think Jim talked too much when you met him in Boston? 

I will never notice when someone talks too much because chances are I’m out talking them. 

What’s your process for dealing with performance anxiety? 

I used to self-medicate for this purpose but I was recently in touch with a psychiatrist who has helped me regulate my own chemical imbalances and I have found that my performance anxiety isn’t really an issue when I have the proper amount of dopamine in the system! 

Imagine that you’re at a party and it’s a little stale. What’s the “party trick” (or hidden talent) that you’d bust out to liven the place up? 

Before the app existed I was known as a real life fruit ninja. I take a big knife and people throw fruit from across the room and I chop it in half in mid-air. It’s not the safest party trick anymore because I lost vision in my right eye a few years ago and I’m not as accurate as I used to be! 

What hobbies do you have outside of music? 

I love sports. I love reading. I love word games. I love gardening. I love hiking/running/moving. My biggest hobby was snowboarding for many years but I’ve grown injury prone and stay off the mountain these days. 

What is the most trouble you ever got into? 

Well, I managed to stay out of trouble until college. But before weed was legalized I had a series of run-ins with the law and spent a night in the clink in Amherst Mass during my freshman year fraternity pledge trip. Luckily this isn’t an issue anymore for those of us who don’t drink or smoke cigarettes but prefer a little of the wacky tabacky to cool down. 

What is the message you would give to your fans? 

Well I give them so many messages all the time but the most important one that I try to remember to keep constant is a message of gratitude. Thank you so much for sticking with us through thick and thin, through ups and downs, for decades now you have allowed us to live our dreams and have the most blessed lives possible. 

How do you feel social media has impacted your music? 

Social media is a double edged sword. It has allowed us to create a strong community where everyone feels like a family but for someone like me who gets addicted to things easily, I really have to be vigilant with practice and writing and other aspects of my life not to spend the whole day scrolling and wasting the time away. 

What is your favorite song of all time? 

Right now my favorite song of all time is probably a short and beautiful little ditty by Labi Siffre called Bless the Telephone. I would suggest everyone take the 1:29 to listen to it and feel the bliss. 

What did I miss for a question that you would like to share? 

Bass players don’t really get to play solo shows, at least not my style of bass, so I’ve had to learn how to DJ in order to perform by myself at times and I would suggest coming out to see a DJ Brownie show at some point. 

Last one! Describe your perfect meal! 

I love to eat great meals. I’m partial to Asian foods but the perfect meal to me is one slice of pizza from Freddie and Peppers on 72nd and Amsterdam in NYC. PERFECTION. 

Follow Marc Brownstein:
Instagram: @marcbrownstein
X (formerly Twitter): @marc_brownstein
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/marcbrownstein4
www.discobiscuits.com

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Gear News

New Gear: Phil Jones Bass X2C Dual Compressor/Effects Loop

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New Gear: Phil Jones Bass X2C Duel Compressor/Effects Loop

Step Into X2C With Phil Jones Bass Dual Compressor/Effects Loop…

Phil Jones Bass latest pedal innovation is the X2C Dual Compressor with Dual Effects Loop for performance and recording. The X2C incorporates advanced compressor circuit technology and provides comprehensive tone control with a dual crossover feature which divides the signal into frequency bands ranging from 100Hz to 500Hz, ensuring exceptional clarity and dynamics in tone refinement. 

With insert jacks on each band, the X2C unlocks limitless creativity, enabling players to use various FX pedals for custom tone sculpting. Additionally, it functions as an electronic crossover, ideal for driving high-performance, 2-way bass rigs.

PJB’s Dual-Band compression design is more flexible than standard single-band compressors and provides a more natural and transparent sound. It also provides greater control over shaping and managing dynamics where standard compressors affect the entire frequency spectrum of an audio signal.  

PJB’s dual compressor enables the player to shape specific frequency ranges of an audio signal which allows for compressing the low frequencies while preserving the high frequencies, or vice-versa. Treating the low-end with a dedicated band also allows for heavy compression without affecting the midrange frequencies, which carry the attack of the sound. 

Effects can be plugged into the insert jacks on the X2C and controlled separately. As an example, the lows can be adjusted separately for an overdrive pedal while the highs can be controlled for a chorus. 

Dividing the audio spectrum into fundamental frequencies and harmonics is also effective in the enrichment of slapping techniques. The low frequencies can be compressed without changing the dynamics of the “slap”. By controlling the low frequencies and focusing the attack on the slap the amplifier will sound louder while avoiding overloading of the amp or speakers. The low band can be compressed without the harmonics being affected. In addition, the send jacks can go to different amplifiers/speakers for a bi-amplification set up.

Compact and potent, the X2C embodies studio-grade excellence, setting a new standard for dynamic processing in an uncompromising, portable pedal. The street price is $359.99.

Visit online at www.pjbworld.com

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Bass Videos

New Gear: Aguilar Amplification Next-generation Tone Hammer and AG Series Amplifiers

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New Gear: Aguilar Amplification Next-generation Tone Hammer and AG Series Amplifiers

New Gear: Aguilar Amplification Next-generation Tone Hammer and AG Series Amplifiers…

Aguilar Amplification is excited to unveil the next generation of Tone Hammer and AG series amplifiers. These amplifiers are designed to meet the exacting standards of today’s bassists, enhancing their musical expression through in-demand features and fresh new designs.

The latest innovations in the Tone Hammer and AG series include the introduction of the Aguilar Cabinet Suite, dual XLR outputs, expanded connectivity options, and power section upgrades. These features not only provide superior sound quality and flexibility but also maintain the classic Aguilar performance that musicians have relied upon.

Key features of the next-generation amplifiers:

Aguilar Cabinet Suite: This new software allows players to load Aguilar ’s custom-designed SL/DB cabinet impulse responses (IRs), or their own custom IR files. This feature is available through both XLR and headphone outputs, offering new tone shaping and cabinet emulation options.
 
Dual XLR Outputs & Expanded Connectivity: Musicians can now tailor their tone and utilize cabinet IRs for their monitor mix, while also sending a pre-EQ ’d signal directly to the front-of-house. This dual functionality ensures optimal sound for both the artist and front-of-house. The new amplifiers include auxiliary input and headphone output options for silent practice. They also feature mix controls to fine-tune the listening experience, ideal for both practice and performance.

Upgraded Power Sections: Previously exclusive to Aguilar’s 700-series, the upgraded power sections in the Tone Hammer and AG 500 now support a 2.67 ohm load and include universal mains. These enhancements make the amplifiers perfect for international touring, offering seamless voltage adaptation.

“The new Tone Hammer and AG series amplifiers are a testament to Aguilar ’s commitment to world class sound and performance, providing bassists with the tools they need to define their sound on the global stage,” remarks Jordan Cortese, Brand Manager, Aguilar Musical Instruments.

The next-generation Tone Hammer and AG series amplifiers are available for purchase through www.aguilaramp.com and Aguilar’s extensive dealer network worldwide. For more information about the new amplifiers and other Aguilar products, please visit www.aguilaramp.com.

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Luthier Spotlight

Luthier Spotlight: Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

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Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

Meet Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses…

In this issue, I have the honor of interviewing Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

You’re obviously not one for name-dropping, but you’ve built basses for some legendary musicians from Colin Greenwood (Radiohead) to Tim Lefebvre (David Bowie, Tedeschi Trucks, Black Crowes). How does it feel when your instruments are played on big stages by these icons?

Not gonna lie!  It really feels pretty amazing. Being at a venue and feeling a bass you made through the sound system rattling your chest… it’s surreal.

I recently got the chance to have Tim Lefevbre pick up his bass at my shop. It was so great to see him take to it right away. I literally dropped him off at rehearsal with it an hour later. When  I got a chance to see him play it the next day with the BlackStar Symphony Orchestra: The Music of David Bowie… let’s just say it was an absolute high note. I think I was smiling for two days straight.

The bulk of my experience building basses for legendary musicians comes directly through my time building for Sadowsky. While I was there I got the chance to build basses for Jason Newsted, Will Lee, Tully Kennedy, Verdine White, Tal Wilkenfeld and definitely some others whose names are escaping me right now.

One of my favorite builds was for Colin Greenwood of Radiohead. He wanted a bass that felt like and sounded like his vintage P bass but that was a bit less worrisome on the road. He brought in one of his favorite P’s for me to get to play and listen to so that I could recreate it…but as a Sadowsky.

That was also a fun lesson for me- there’s a lot of geometry you can tweak in the neck pocket that can drastically change the feel of a bass. The neck pocket, more than anything, was the main difference between a “normal” Sadowsky and Collin’s vintage P. Dialing in the neck pocket for the right feel was crucial. Colin was so at home with his P bass that other instruments felt “wrong.”

Collin came to pick up his bass while Radiohead had a multi-night gig at Madison Square Garden. I still have the backstage pass to that show next to my workbench pegboard, right next to my BlackStar Symphony Orchestra ticket.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

Is there a quintessential L.E.H. musician? Who are you building for lately?
Oh gosh! I get this one a lot, and I don’t want to build for a specific subset. A lot of things have become polarized in the past several years and music bridges gaps. I just want to make a bass that anyone can feel at home with. That’s my goal. I want my bass to be able to adjust to you and age with you and be the thing you can pass down to your kid who is going to do something I cannot even fathom with it.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

You are also a musician on top of being a builder. How does that influence your building?
I’m not the greatest musician, but my greatest talent as a musician is being able to be a blank slate for playing styles. I can play-test a bass or a pickup combo and leave myself and my music out of it. Very neutral fretting and right-hand technique.

Another lesson from my time at Sadowsky was our “listening tests” for new pickups or tone woods.  As a new guy, it was “ear-opening” to be in a room with all my colleagues listening to someone play bass and hear the differences between the players and the pickups. By learning to make myself neutral and generic, I could find the nuance in the sound.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

What role does your dog play in the process? It must be important.
Hahaha.. Yes! She is crucial. Burnout is not a joke. She helps me remember to take a breath and step away periodically. This is normally communicated by dropping a tennis ball at my feet and tilting her head slightly to the side. That’s her way of reminding me that whatever nuance I am squinting over is not as important as our ongoing game of fetch.

What’s the coolest part of an L.E.H. bass that tends to go unnoticed?
I’m not sure if it is the coolest, but my favorite aspects are the way that things line up together. Things that you don’t really think about unless they are off. For instance, if there is a pickguard, it lines up perfectly with the control plate. That’s because I get the plates cut, prepare them for plating, and check that the fit matches as the edges are de-burred and smoothed. I also have a new magnetic battery cover that fits into the backplate, and that is of course a perfect match.

One thing that is tricky but fun to line up is the treble side of the neck pocket where the heel is parallel to the body. If the body sticks out in front of it, that’s a deal breaker. I anticipate the thickness of the body’s poly finish versus the neck’s thin nitro finish and undercut it to make it either a perfect match or a slightly inset from the neck. It makes everything feel cohesive as you play up the neck near the body.

Okay now tell us about the faders.
I thought you’d never ask! I love those things! That was an idea that I came up with in order to simplify the controls and make adjustments easy for players at all times. I like the visual element too, because not only does it look cool, but you can see the EQ right there on the body of the bass.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

What do you tell a client who’s a little wary of a bass that looks too out there?
First off, I guess I’d say to quit worrying!! Then I’d have to ask, what’s so “out there” about my basses? I know the headstock is a lot, but that mass helps the bass sing and pretty much eliminates dead spots. I also know the faders are a new thing, but trust me.. once you try it, you’re gonna love it. A client recently told me that he was a little wary of my faders but once he got it out of the case he said that it felt very, very easy to dial in what I was looking for on both the faders and the knobs.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

For more than several years (sixteen to be precise) you worked at Sadowsky Guitars. What was that like?
Initially it was amazing. I got to level up my skill set in one of the best shops in the world with the best people and the best tools. But after leveling up, I wanted to push further. It wasn’t possible to go beyond the designs there. Yes, I could change my building technique and improve in very small ways, but in order to improve in a big way I had to move on and explore for myself. That’s why I started making my own designs. The biggest improvement I made, or rather, the biggest realization I made that led to an improvement was collaborating with Roger Sadowsky and Chip Shearin in designing the Sadowsky Single Cut.

On paper, the task was simple: make a single-cut bass with 24 frets and a bolt-on neck. What I didn’t expect to find was that the giant neck pocket improved the classic Sadowsky 24-fret model significantly. It added sustain, it reduced dead spots, and it made the long neck of the 24-fret much more solid. All that added up to making that bass much more acoustic and organic.

I kept that experience in mind when I designed the original Offset. I maximized the neck pocket and made the most solid neck-to-body contact that I could while still maintaining the aesthetic of a double cut. Honestly, I couldn’t be happier about the end result. I feel like I found the happy spot between cool Fender vibe and a solution to Fender-style-build problems

You’re known for a lot of things in regard to your builds, but tell us how you came up with your body design. Where did the offset shape originate?
With the Offset design, I’m attempting to evolve tradition. The goal is something immediately recognizable and, to be honest, just plain cool. Fender designs aren’t the most comfortable, balanced, or playable, but they are iconic. I took where they left off, offset the curves more for balance, carved the back for more comfort, and added a bunch of small improvements that I had learned over the past several years building Fender-style instruments.

Alright, so this isn’t exactly bass-related, but what’s with the space thing?
Ha! Yes….. Ok! I am weirdly obsessed with space. Since I was a kid, I’ve loved space exploration. In the 80’s I went to garage sales and was on the lookout for National Geographic Issues from the late 60’s that had amazing images and would tear out records of sounds from space. Never did find a lunar landing issue fully intact. But that’s ok, now there’s the internet.

I guess I use space imagery as a backdrop for what I do because space imagery feels like endless possibilities. My 10-year-old self would totally dig it.

Ellis Hahn of LEH Basses

Ok, final questions: Where can we find you on social media and how can our readers order a bass?
Important questions! Thanks for asking. My only social media thing I do is Instagram. I’m @lehguitars. And ordering a bass is the fun part. If you have an idea for a build or questions about my instruments please email me: LEHguitars@gmail.com.

I like to walk clients through all the ins and outs of their options and make sure we’re building the right bass for them. That way when the bass is complete, I can be sure that they are getting exactly what they want and need in their new instrument.

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Gear News

New Gear: Spector Doug Wimbish USA Custom Series Basses

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Doug Wimbish, pictured with the new Spector Doug Wimbish USA Custom Series basses

Spector offers Doug Wimbish USA Custom Series basses…

Spector, a leading authority in bass guitar design, unveils two new Doug Wimbish USA Custom Series basses. Synonymous with bass excellence since 1987, Wimbish collaborated with Spector’s USA Custom Shop to create the DW-4 and DW-5 models, echoing the iconic instruments that have been favored heavily throughout his recording and performing career.
 
These signature basses faithfully replicate Wimbish’s originals, down to the smallest details like neck contours and nut widths. Customized EMG pickups, developed in collaboration with Wimbish, capture the distinctive sound that has shaped his monumental musical impact. These models invite players to explore the feel and response that have defined Wimbish’s signature style over the years.
 
Available in 4-string and 5-string versions, each model boasts unique features & finish options. The DW-4 comes in Amber Stain Gloss and Black Stain Gloss options, while the DW-5 offers Dark Blue Stain Gloss and Faded Natural Gloss. Every purchase includes a certificate of authenticity signed by Doug Wimbish. Wimbish comments, “Spector took the time to get every little nuance right, and that to me is dedication and being thoughtful enough to know ‘I want to nail it,’ and they did. I’m able to pick these instruments up for the first time and play them like I’ve already had them for years.”

For more information, visit spectorbass.com/doug-wimbish-usa-signature-series/.

Photo: Doug Wimbish, pictured with the new Spector Doug Wimbish USA Custom Series basses

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