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Talk Teach Perform, Talk Practice Perform

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The Power of One Note

Sometimes, just before sleep, you enter this nether world where all of a sudden the germ of an idea takes shape.

A couple of days ago, this happened to me. I was thinking about my role as a bass teacher and what the role of the student is and I came up with the aforementioned slogan, “Talk Teach Perform, Talk Practice Perform.”

With YouTube videos, online instruction & workshops, plus one-on-one training, there is so much to choose from and so many viewpoints, how is one to choose, and then how is one to know that they made the right decision?

Let’s explore this a little bit.

A few weeks ago I was speaking with a friend of mine who plays both upright and electric and I posed a question to him:

What would be the difference in learning styles between upright and electric bass?”

I then explained that I thought the upright bassist would begin with a method book, be it Simandl or Nany, and the electric player would be more inclined to go to YouTube and learn songs. In other words, the upright player would probably have formal instruction from the beginning and like me, when I picked up the electric bass, I wanted to learn tunes and play in a band. I didn’t start really studying the bass until I went to Berklee and since then I haven’t stopped.

So when we get to the point where a teacher is needed what do we do?

I take my role when teaching very seriously. Having had both good  experiences and bad experiences with private study I take my teaching very seriously.

This is essentially where the “Talk Teach Perform” concept came from.

Let’s look it over. Let’s start with “Talk.”

I believe in the initial consultation. As a teacher, it is important to articulate and explain your approach, which should include reading music theory, harmony ear training and repertoire. I also think it is important to talk about influences and I always suggest recordings by important musicians, not just bassists.

From the student perspective; “Talk Practice Perform”

It is important to “talk” about what you are looking for, who you listen to, and what experience you may have on your instrument. When you go to a qualified teacher, it is important to remember that wherever you are in your abilities, you are looking for guidance as to how to improve and the same things; reading music theory, harmony, ear training and repertoire should be stressed.

As you see, both student and teacher need to be on the same page. (No pun intended?)

Let’s get to the second part; as an instructor, it is incumbent upon you to create a curriculum not only for the lesson but for practice routines to be suggested that will embed the information over the long haul. Every student is different and every student has a different learning style so keep that in mind however, the basic learning tools are the same.

As a student, your job is to “Practice.”

Doing a regular daily practice will in just a few week’s time show you noticeable improvement and that’s exactly what you want to see. I suggest keeping a journal on your music stand so you can look back over the few weeks and see where you were and where you now are. It’s important to celebrate each small victory. Just so you know, no matter how accomplished you become, you are always learning and it is great to look back and see all you have accomplished.

The third part is what we are all here for…“Performance”

I believe that one of the students best assets is being able to watch their teacher perform. Performing lets you see how your instructor synthesizes everything he or she is showing you, as well as how he or she is interacting with both bandmates and audiences. Now we all know that in this troubling time, performing is not as easy as it was, but this too will change.

From the student perspective, performing will solidify so much of what you learn, and even if it is just you and a guitar player at home or online, you will assuredly improve every time you do it!

I hope you found this an interesting albeit provocative article.

As I said, with all of the possible opportunities to learn up there, it is more difficult to find the right fit. I take my teaching very seriously and believe COVID has made it easier to find great instruction and at the same time not so great instruction.

I hope both teachers and students will find this useful. All my best and stay safe and healthy!

David C Gross has been the bassist for a lot of folks. He has written 14 bass books and 3 instructional videos, hosts “The Notes From An Artist Radio Show” on www.cygnusradio.com Monday nights 8 PM EDT, and the “Notes From An Artist” podcast available on iTunes, Spotify and all podcast platforms.

NFAA brings you behind the scenes with individuals who forged a timeless musical canon – spanning rock, jazz, funk, blues, folk, country, and permutations thereof. Listen to stories and anecdotes hitherto untold and relive more than a few chronicles that have become lore with a fresh vision. It’s the soundtrack of our lives. Celebrate the past, live in the present, and anticipate the future – take Notes From An Artist

You can contact David @ www.thebassguitarchannel.com/contact for more information regarding his online lessons and world-renown correspondence course.

Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part II

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part II

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

In the last lesson, we were studying triads in their fundamental position. This time, we are going to study what is known as the first inversion of the triads.

The first inversion consists of the third going on the bass in the triad, as we will see below:

C Major Triad (1st inversion)
E – G – B
C Minor Triad (1st inversion)
Eb – G – B
C Diminished Triad (1st inversion)
Eb – Gb – C
C Augmented Triad (1st inversion)
E – G# – C

See you next month for Part III… GROOVE ON!!!

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Bass Edu

Approach Notes – Part 6 

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James Rosocha

Approach Notes – Part 6 

As we move into lesson six of approach notes applied to chord tones, it’s important to go back and review the previous approaches. The constant review and application of these concepts will add a layer of chromaticism to both your bass lines and solos. The approaches need to be burned into your long term/ permanent memory for them to come out in your playing. 

This first example approaches a third inversion of a G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic approach from below and a double chromatic approach from above approaches the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, 5th, single from below and double chromatic from above to the 7th, continue to the root, 3rd, and back down. 

The next example approaches the G major arpeggio in root position.

The next example approaches the root of a G major 7th arpeggio as a single chromatic from below and a double chromatic approach from above -before continuing to the third, fifth, seventh, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the root, continue to the third, fifth, and come back down. 

The next example approaches the first inversion of G major 7th arpeggio. 

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the third, continue to the fifth, seventh, root, single chromatic from below/ double from above to the third, continue up to the fifth and seventh, and back down. 

The third example approaches a second inversion of a G major arpeggio

A single chromatic from below/ double from above approaches the fifth, continue to the 7th, root, 3rd, single from above/ double from below to the 5th, continue to the 7th, root, and back down.

After studying these various approach notes, you will begin to recognize the concepts utilized in your favorite solos. Continue the journey and good luck! 

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Bass Edu

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I

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Jaime David Vazquez - Lessons For Bass Guitar

Triads & Inversions Part I

Hello bass players and bass fans! In this issue, we are going to study the triads and their inversions.

It is very important for all bassists to understand and master the triads, but it is even more important to understand their different inversions.

In Part I, we are going to learn what the triad is in fundamental position.

The Formula consists of root, third and fifth.

Degrees of the Triad

Major Triad: 1 – 3 – 5
Minor Triad: 1 – b3 – 5
Diminished Triad: 1 – b3 – b5
Augmented Triad: 1 – 3 – #5

Fig.1 – The C, Cm, Cdim & Caug triads
(Fundamental Position)

BASS LINES: Triads & Inversions Part I
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Bass Edu

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

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Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice's Bassist Lewis Bridges - From the Album, Grotesque

Premiere! Bass Playthrough With Foetal Juice’s Bassist Lewis Bridges – From the Album, Grotesque

Bassist Lewis Bridges Shares…

“Gruesome’s sparse intro marks a stark contrast from the intensity of the rest of the album.  The original intention was to keep the bass simple but colourful, however as I worked on it, the lines grew more expressive and the more striking flourishes began to emerge.  The intensity builds into a harmonic minor passage that takes us into the drop — a signature death grind cacophony.  This is where Foetal Juice thrives.  You’re getting a full-on right-hand barrage to in the face to take you into a groove-laden mulch-fest.

I owe my throbbing bass tone to the Darkglass Alpha Omega pedal borrowed from our sound engineer, Chris Fielding (ex-Conan), mixed with the clarity of the tried and true Ampeg SVT CL.

As mentioned earlier, colourful basslines are important, especially in a one-guitar band. Chucking some funny intervals and odd flourishes here and there brings life into the brutality. There’s no point sounding brutal if it’s not gonna be fucking evil too!

Recording this playthrough was hard work. This was not the fault of James Goodwin (Necronautical), who was kindly filming and is ace to work with, but because in true Foetal fashion, we had stinking hangovers — and that jam room was hot!”

Follow Online

FB @FoetalJuice
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IG @foetaljuice
Youtube: @Foetaljuice
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Foetaljuice.bandcamp.com

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Bass Edu

Bass Lines: The Circle

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jaime Vazquez

Bass Lines: The Circle…

Hello bass players and fans of bass! This month we’re going to study “The Circle.”

The Circle of Fourths can also be called “The Circle of Fifths or just The Circle.

Practicing the scales, chords, and ideas in general via the circle has been a common practice routine for jazz musicians and highly recommended.

It is a disciplined way of working through all twelve keys.

Plus, many bass root movements to jazz and pop songs move through sections of the circle.

Fig. 1 – “The Circle”

See you next month for more full bass attack!

#bassmusicianmag, #basslines, #bmmbasslines, #groovemaniac, #thecircle, #thecircleoffourths, #thecircleoffifths,#scales & #chords.

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